North Korea Nuclear Test Feb 12th 2013

On 12th February 2013, North Korea conducted an underground nuclear test, its third in seven years. A tremor that exhibited a nuclear bomb signature with an initial magnitude 4.9 (later revised to 5.1) was detected by The China Earthquake Networks Center, Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization Preparatory Commission and the United States Geological Survey.



This sound recording is made from collected mini-SEED BHZ data from station MAJO (GSN) and archived on IRIS Wilbur II. Sound processing of this data used Sonifyer (Speed x50) and Audacity effects of normalisation, bass boost and vocoder were used.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2013_North_Korean_nuclear_test
http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eventpage/usc000f5t0#summary
http://www.iris.edu/hq/files/programs/education_and_outreach/retm/tm_130212_northkorea/130212NorthKorea.pdf

Nuclear URL REFERENCES:

Commission for the Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO)
http://www.ctbto.org/

Nuclear Detonation: Weapons, Improvised Nuclear Devices
http://www.remm.nlm.gov/nuclearexplosion.htm

2006 North Korean Nuclear Test
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2006_North_Korean_nuclear_test

Comparison of Earthquake Energy to Nuclear Explosion Energy
http://www.jclahr.com/alaska/aeic/magnitude/energy.txt

Geodynamics & National Security - Los Alamos National Laboratory
http://www.ees.lanl.gov/ees11/geophysics/geody/

REFERENCE PAPERS

NUMERICAL MODELLING AND OBSERVATIONS OF NUCLEAR-EXPLOSION CODA WAVEFIELDS - 2009
CHAOYING ZHANG


WAVE PROPAGATION FROM COMPLEX 3D SOURCES USING THE REPRESENTATION THEOREM - 2010
Jeffry L. Stevens and Heming Xu


SEISMIC WAVE GENERATION AND PROPAGATION FROM COMPLEX 3D EXPLOSION SOURCES - 2011
Jeffry L. Stevens and Michael O’Brien


BOOKS:

Nuclear Explosions and Earthquakes: The Parted Veil - 1976
Bruce Bolt
http://www.amazon.com/Nuclear-Explosions-Earthquakes-Parted-geology/dp/0716702762

NOTES:

Earthquakes are caused by sideways slippage on a fault plane, while underground nuclear explosions push outward in all directions.

In order to discuss the strengths of nuclear explosives, it is necessary to have a scale of energy release. This scale is also of importance in making comparisons
between the energies of underground explosions and natural earthquakes.

Energy decrease is called geometrical spreading and frictional attenuation (earth structure) and calculation of geometrical spreading is required to arrive at an estimate of the seismic yield (Ys)

The energy released by nuclear weapons is traditionally expressed in terms of the energy stored in a kiloton or megaton of the conventional explosive trinitrotoluene (TNT).

One kiloton is one thousand (10-3) tons, one megaton is one million (10-6) tons.

Moment Magnitude Scale of Nuclear Explosions
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moment_magnitude_scale#Nuclear_explosions

Nuclear Weapon Yield
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_weapon_yield